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Methods of Wellbeing A discussion on how you're managing your state of health (herbs, vitamins, acupuncture, chiropractic etc.) NO LINKING TO COMMERCIAL SITES PLEASE. Paxilprogress does not investigate nor endorse any supplement program.

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Old 10-24-2005, 08:56 PM   #1
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Omega info...All in one Thread.

I thought I'd post this for those who don't search the net for info but want to know more about Omega 3 Fatty Acids.

What Is It?
Omega-3 fatty acids are a form of polyunsaturated fats, one of four basic types of fat that the body derives from food. (Cholesterol, saturated fat, and monounsaturated fat are the others.) All polyunsaturated fats, including the omega-3s, are increasingly recognized as important to human health.

Eating too many foods rich in saturated fats has been associated with the development of degenerative diseases, including heart disease and even cancer. Polyunsaturated fatty acids, however, are actually good for you. Omega-3s (found primarily in cold-water fish) fall into this category, along with omega-6s, another type of polyunsaturated fatty acids found in grains, most plant-based oils, poultry, and eggs.

Why "essential?" Omega-3s (and omega-6s) are termed essential fatty acids (EFAs) because they are critical for good health. However, the body cannot make them on its own. For this reason, omega-3s must be obtained from food, thus making outside sources of these fats "essential."

Although the body needs both omega-3s and omega-6s to thrive, most people consume far more 6s than 3s. Hardly a day goes by, however, without reports of another health benefit associated with omega-3s. For this reason, many experts recommend consuming a better balance these two EFAs.

Different types of omega-3s. Key omega-3 fatty acids include eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA), both found primarily in oily cold-water fish such as tuna, salmon, and mackerel. Aside from fresh seaweed, a staple of many cultures, plant foods rarely contain EPA or DHA.

However, a third omega-3, called alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), is found primarily in dark green leafy vegetables, flaxseed oils, and certain vegetable oils. Although ALA has different effects on the body than EPA and DHA do, the body has enzymes that can convert ALA to EPA. All three are important to human health.

Health Benefits
Scientists made one of the first associations between omega-3s and human health while studying the Inuit (Eskimo) people of Greenland in the 1970s. As a group, the Inuit suffered far less from certain diseases (coronary heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes mellitus, psoriasis) than their European counterparts. Yet their diet was very high in fat from eating whale, seal, and salmon. Eventually researchers realized that these foods were all rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which provided real disease-countering benefits

Researchers continue to explore this exciting field. They've found that without a sufficient supply of polyunsaturated omega-3s, the body will use saturated fat to construct cell membranes. The resulting cell membranes, however, are less elastic, a situation that can have a negative effect on the heart because it makes it harder to return to a resting state.

In addition, nutritionists have come to recognize the importance of balancing omega-3 fatty acids with omega-6 fatty acids in the diet. Because most people on a typical Western diet consume far more omega-6-rich foods (including cereals, whole-grain bread, baked goods, fried foods, margarine, and others), the ratio is out of balance for almost everyone. This means for most Americans the emphasis now needs to be on increasing omega-3s to make the ratio more even.

The bottom line: Omega-3s appear to help prevent and treat various disorders in different ways. For example, research suggests that in individuals with non-insulin-dependent (or type 2) diabetes, omega-3s can improve insulin sensitivity. They work yet another way to ease menstrual pain, and so on.

Specifically, omega-3s in fish oil or other forms may help to:
Improve heart health. Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to play a part in keeping cholesterol levels low, stabilizing irregular heart beat (arrhythmia), and reducing blood pressure. Researchers now believe that alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), one of the omega-3s, is particularly beneficial for protecting against heart and vessel disease, and for lowering cholesterol and triglyceride levels. An excellent source of ALA is flaxseed oil, sold as both a liquid oil and a semisolid margarine-like spread.

Omega-3 fatty acids are also natural blood thinners, reducing the "stickiness" of blood cells (called platelet aggregation), which can lead to such complications as blood clots and stroke.

Reduce hypertension. Studies of large groups of people have found that the more omega-3 fatty acids people consume, the lower their overall blood pressure level is. This was the case with the Greenland Eskimos who ate a lot of oily, cold-water fish, for example.

Improve rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, Raynaud's disease, and other autoimmune diseases. Diets high in omega-3 fatty acids (such as fish oils) have been shown to increase survival in people with autoimmune diseases. This is probably because the omega-3s help the arteries--as well as many other parts of the body--stay inflammation free. EPA and DHA are successful at this because they can be converted into natural anti-inflammatory substances called prostaglandins and leukotrienes, compounds that help decrease inflammation and pain

In numerous studies over the years, participants with inflammatory diseases have reported less joint stiffness, swelling, tenderness, and overall fatigue when taking omega-3s.

In 1998, an exciting review of well-designed, randomized clinical trials reported that omega-3 fatty acids were more successful than a placebo ("dummy drug") in improving the condition of people with rheumatoid arthritis. The research also showed that getting more omega-3 fatty acids enabled some participants to reduce their use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)

Improve depression and symptoms of other mental health problems. The brain is remarkably fatty: In fact, this organ is 60% fat and needs omega-3s to function properly. Now researchers have discovered a link between mood disorders and the presence of low concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids in the body.

Apparently, omega-3s help regulate mental health problems because they enhance the ability of brain-cell receptors to comprehend mood-related signals from other neurons in the brain. In other words, the omega-3s are believed to help keep the brain's entire traffic pattern of thoughts, reactions, and reflexes running smoothly and efficiently.

Clinical trials are underway to further investigate whether supplementing the diet with omega-3s will reduce the severity of such psychiatric problems as mild to moderate depression, dementia, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Interestingly, the oil used to help the child with a degenerative nerve disorder in the popular film Lorenzo's Oil was an omega-3 fatty acid.

Aid cancer prevention and cancer support. Preliminary research from the University of California, Los Angeles, suggests that omega-3 fatty acids may help maintain healthy breast tissue and prevent breast cancer. Also, in a recent study, participants who supplemented their diet with fish oils produced fewer quantities of a carcinogen associated with colon cancer than did a placebo group. More research into this exciting use for omega-3s is underway.

Dosage Information
There is no established recommended daily intake for omega-3s, but a healthy diet containing significant amounts of foods rich in this essential fatty acid is clearly wise. By increasing your intake of omega-3 fatty acids, you will naturally bring the ratio of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids back into a healthier, 2-1 or (optimally) 1-1 balance.

Try to reduce your consumption of omega-6-rich foods at the same time that you increase your intake of omega-3-rich foods in the following categories:

--Marine sources: Atlantic salmon and other fatty, preferably cold-water fish, including herring (both Atlantic and Pacific), sardines, Atlantic halibut, bluefish, tuna, and Atlantic mackerel. The American Heart Association recommends that people eat tuna or salmon at least twice a week.

As a reasonable substitute (or even an occasional alternative) for fresh fish, commercial fish oil capsules are available containingomega-3s such as DHA and EPA
.
--Wild game: Surprisingly, venison and buffalo are both good sources of omega-3s and make a healthy choice for people craving meat. These wild game meats can be purchased through mail-order sources if your supermarket doesn't carry them.

--Plant sources: Canola oil, flaxseed, flaxseed oil, walnuts, and leafy green vegetables such as purslane are all good sources of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), the plant-based omega-3. A quarter-cup (1 ounce) of walnuts supplies about 2 grams of plant-based omega-3 fatty acids, slightly more than is found in 3 ounces of salmon.

WholehealthMD's extensive Healing Kitchen provides details on the nutrients in many of these foods, as well as recipes to include in your diet.

--Enhanced food: In the U.S., these include omega-3 enriched eggs; breads are sometimes enhanced in other countries

Guidelines for Use
Pregnant women and infants need plenty of omega-3s to nourish the developing brain of the fetus and young child. If a pregnant woman gets too few omega-3s, the growing fetus will take all that's available. This could set the stage for depression in the mother. Talk to your obstetrician and pediatrician about specific requirements.

General Interaction
There are no known drug or nutrient interactions associated with increased consumption of omega-3 fatty acids through foods. However, if you decide to take omega-3s through supplements (especially those containing fish oils), be sure to check with your doctor first if you are taking a blood-thinner such as warfarin or heparin.

Possible Side Effects
There are no known side effects associated with increasing your intake of omega-3 fatty acids through foods, although fish oil capsules do pose the risk of a "burp" factor. This is a harmless, although not exactly pleasant, fish-y aftertaste that occurs with some brands of fish oil capsules.

Cautions
One benefit of omega-3 fatty acids is that they are very safe to consume. However, most sources recommend that fish consumption be limited to two to three servings weekly because so many fish are tainted with mercury and other contaminants. Fish oil capsules don't present this same risk
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Old 10-24-2005, 08:57 PM   #2
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Re: Omega info...All in one Thread.

OMEGA 3 BENEFITS
Omega 3 Fish Oils and Diet Help Alleviate Depression
Dr. Barry Sears
Zone Labs



CBN.com – Clinical depression is a disabling condition in which life becomes a hopeless morass where there is no joy. In the past, this condition was called melancholy. You lose pleasure for things that brought you enjoyment in the past. In fact, it becomes difficult to conjure up previously happy times. Any motivation for the future, let alone the next day, evaporates.

Depression has increased significantly in the past century, with nearly 20 million people now affected by it. The increase in its incidence correlates very well with our decreasing intake of fish and fish oil in the same time period.

Psychiatric researchers learned several decades ago that depression is often caused by lack of the neurotransmitter serotonin. In fact, drug companies have made billions off of the development of drugs to boost serotonin levels like Prozac, Paxil, and Zoloft, all of which have become household names. More recent research has found that even non-depressed people experience an improvement in their moods when they take one of these drugs. What this indicates to me is that our nation has developed a serotonin deficiency.

Why? Researchers believe the answer lies in our reduced intake of long-chain Omega-3 fatty acids. Since one of the benefits of high-dose fish oil is to increase serotonin levels, it is not unreasonable to think that the decrease in fish oil consumption in the past century led to a decrease in the natural levels of serotonin in the brain.* Furthermore, using an imaging test known as SPECT, researchers have found that blood flow within a normal brain is uniform, whereas blood flow in depressed patients is scattered with "holes" in which little or no blood flow is observed. Since high-dose fish oil can improve blood flow, we now have another potential clue to explain the molecular basis of depression. Finally, the Greenland Eskimos have virtually no depression.

Could it be that simply eating a greater amount of fish is the answer to this growing incidence of depression? If that is the case, then there should be a strong correlation between the amount of fish consumed and the extent of depression.

The rates of depression in Japan are just a fraction of the rates in America and the rates in other countries where low amounts of fish are eaten. In fact, New Zealanders have 50 times the rate of depression as the Japanese and eat the least amount of fish in the industrialized world. (What's more, they eat very large amounts of harmful Omega-6 fatty acids). In native Greenland, Eskimos, who consume some 7-10 grams per day of long-chain Omega-3 fatty acids, have virtually no depression even though their living conditions can be pretty depressing with only an hour or two of sunlight a day during the winter months.

Epidemiological studies, however, only indicate association, not causality. Perhaps the Japanese and Eskimos just have good genes, and the amount of fish they consume has nothing to do with it. (That's not what researchers believe, but such confounding factors can come into play with epidemiological studies.) That possibility is unlikely since animal studies demonstrate a significant increase in the amount of serotonin in the frontal cortex of their brains if they consume high-dose fish compared to animals that were given a standard diet rich in Omega-6 fats.

NOTE BELOW: THIS IS TALKING ABOUT THE RATIO OF OMEGA 6 TO 3 THAT I"M ALWAYS TALKING ABOUT...

These animal studies have been verified by recent research in humans that indicates the AA/EPA ratio (a ratio of two essential fatty acids, Arachadonic Acid and Eicosapetenoic Acid) is highly elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid of depressed patients when compared to non-depressed patients. Likewise, Belgian studies indicate that depressed patients have lower levels of total Omega-3 fatty acids in their blood. British researchers have confirmed this observation.

A blood test called the AA/EPA ratio measures the amount of Omega 3 compared to Omega 6 in one’s blood as the benchmark for judging Silent Inflammation in the body. AA, or Arachidonic acid, is an Omega 6 fat that causes a pro-inflammatory hormonal response, while EPA, or Eicosapentaenoic acid, is an Omega 3 fat that causes an anti-inflammatory hormonal response. By balancing this AA/EPA level in the blood, one will be able to control Silent Inflammation. The ideal marker for wellness is an AA/EPA ratio of 1.5.

One reason why increased consumption of fish oils would improve depression is because it causes a reduction in AA (Arachidonic Acid) levels. In addition, researchers have found that the higher the intake of fish oil, the greater the improvement in the AA/EPA ratio. This ratio has also been found to correlate strongly with the severity of the disease.

All of this research called for an intervention study to determine the impact that high-dose fish oil could actually have in treating depression. Andrew Stoll and his colleagues at Harvard Medical School used exactly this approach in tackling the most severe form of depression called bipolar depression. Bipolar patients cycle from the depths of depression to a manic high and then back again. The most common drugs prescribed for manic-depression, lithium and valproate, both block the release of arachidonic acid in the brain. Unfortunately, both drugs (especially lithium) have significant toxic side effects. So a search for a safer alternative led Stoll to investigate the use of long-chain Omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil.

In Stoll's experiment, one group of patients with bipolar depression took an ultra-refined fish oil containing 10 grams per day of long-chain Omega-3 fatty acids. The other group of patients took a placebo containing olive oil. After four months of the nine-month-long trial, the researchers ended the trial early because the divergence between the fish oil group and the control group was so great that they felt it was unethical to continue the study. (Another small complicating factor was that the supply of ultra-refined fish oil provided by the U.S. government had run out.) Even in this shortened trial, those on the high-dose fish oil experienced stabilization in their symptoms, while those on the olive oil control experienced significant worsening of their symptoms.

Now the question is what was happening inside the brain to help alleviate depression in the patients who took fish oil? A pretty good assumption is that serotonin levels increased in the brain's frontal cortex, as has already been demonstrated in animal experiments. Increased EPA consumption through fish oil supplementation also probably decreased the AA/EPA ratio in both the cerebrospinal fluid that bathes the brain and the blood lipids, and this led to a corresponding decrease in depression. Such a decrease in the AA/EPA ratio would also reduce the levels of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids, which would cut off a cycle that leads to the production of "bad" eicosanoids such as PGE2 that are known to be increased in the depressed patients. Finally, high-dose fish oil almost certainly improved blood flow to the depressed patients' brains, providing a more uniform distribution of critical nutrients such as oxygen and glucose.

These are some complex and striking consequences for a relatively simple dietary intervention, yet, as dramatic as these result were, some believe they could have been even better if the Harvard researchers had brought these patients' insulin levels under control (through the Zone dietary recommendations) while supplementing with even higher levels of fish oil. A lower level of insulin would have further decreased the production of arachidonic acid, thus enhancing the benefits of high-dose fish oil supplementation. In addition, lower insulin levels would have maintained a more constant supply of blood sugar to the brain.


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*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. As with any natural product, individual results will vary.



Dr. Barry Sears is a leader in the field of dietary control of hormonal response. A former research scientist at the Boston University School of Medicine and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dr. Sears has dedicated his efforts over the past 25 years to the study of lipids and their inflammatory role in the development of chronic disease. He holds 13 U.S. Patents in the areas of intravenous drug delivery systems and hormonal regulation for the treatment of cardiovascular disease

http://www.cbn.com/health/NaturalHea...depression.asp
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Old 10-24-2005, 08:57 PM   #3
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Re: Omega info...All in one Thread.

Through rat experiments, scientists discovered both omega-3 fatty acids and uridine (a natural substance found in foods) work just as well as antidepressants in preventing signs of depression. To draw this conclusion, scientists:

Placed rats in a tank of water where they had no choice but to swim.

As time passed, the rats realized swimming was useless and began to float -- a sign of surrender to depression. Yet when given an antidepressant drug, the rats resumed swimming.

When the rats were given combined doses of omega-3 fatty acids and uridine instead of antidepressants, similar behavior occurred -- lending evidence these natural components are equally effective as drugs.

http://www.mercola.com/2005/feb/23/food_depression.htm
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Old 10-24-2005, 08:58 PM   #4
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Re: Omega info...All in one Thread.

This article coming from Psychiatry!! EPA is in Fish Oil. It seems to rebalance the Omega 6 in depressed people. The message seems to be that when purchasing fishoil to look for the highest possible EPA value. (Bolding is mine)

http://www.psychiatrysource.com/psyc...rticle1550.htm

Increased arachidonic acid levels linked to depression
27 May 2005
Researchers from Israel have found a link between depressive symptoms and increased levels of an omega-6 fatty acid in the brain, suggesting a role for the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in the pathophysiologic processes underlying depression.

A "phospholipid hypothesis" for depression has been proposed by previous research, but in most cases it has been suggested that a deficiency in omega-3 fatty acids is the contributing factor, observe Pnina Green (Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Petah Tiqva, Israel) and colleagues.

While research has found reduced concentrations of omega-3 fatty acid in the blood of depressed individuals, the inability to examine brain tissue has made it difficult to provide direct evidence of the role of omega-3 fatty acids, say the researchers.

To overcome this, Green et al studied fatty acid concentrations in brain tissue samples taken from an animal model of depression – the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rat.

They compared the brains of these rodents with those of normal rats, all of which had eaten exactly the same diets.

Contrary to expectations, the researchers found no difference in omega-3 fatty acid concentrations in the brains of the two groups of rats. However, they did discover an increase in the concentration of the omega-6 fatty acid arachidonic acid (AA) in the FSL rats in all the brain regions studied.

Specifically, compared with normal rats, AA levels were 21% higher in the hypothalamus of the FSL rats, 24% higher in the nucleus accumbens, raised by 31% in the prefrontal cortex, and by 23% in the striatum.

The researchers note that AA is also the PUFA that is modulated by mood stabilizing agents.

"The present findings may also explain the beneficial effect of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) supplementation in depressive patients," they say.

"If, like in rats, the main PUFA disturbance in the brain of depressive patients is increased arachidonic acid, it is possible that eicosapentaenoic acid treatment leads to normalization of the elevated level of AA, rather than to an increase in the level of omega-3 PUFA."
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Old 10-24-2005, 08:59 PM   #5
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Re: Omega info...All in one Thread.

Omega-3 is Essential to the Human Body

A Purdue University study has showed that kids low in Omega-3 essential fatty acids are significantly more likely to be hyperactive, have learning disorders, and to display behavioral problems. Omega-3 deficiencies have also been tied to many conditions, including the following:

dyslexia violence
depression memory problems
weight gain cancer
heart disease eczema
allergies inflammatory diseases
arthritis diabetes

Over 2,000 scientific studies have demonstrated the wide range of problems associated with Omega-3 deficiencies. The American diet is almost devoid of Omega 3's, except for certain types of fish.

In fact, researchers believe that about 60% of Americans are deficient in Omega-3 fatty acids, and about 20% have so little that test methods cannot even detect any in their blood.
The human brain is more than 60% structural fat, just as your muscles are made of protein and your bones are made of calcium. But it's not just any fat that our brains are made of. It has to be certain types of fats, and we no longer eat these types of fats like we used to.

Worse, we eat man-made trans-fats and excessive amounts of saturated fats and vegetable oils high in Omega-6 fatty acids, all of which interfere which our body's attempt to utilize the tiny amount of Omega-3 fats that it gets.

Other parts of our bodies also need Omega-3 fatty acids. Symptoms of fatty acid deficiency include a variety of skin problems such as eczema, thick patches of skin, and cracked heels.


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To get the necessary Omega-3 fatty acids, you must eat meat that is allowed to "free-range", or in the case of cattle, to be grass-fed. You cannot buy this grass-fed beef at your local grocery store.

But you can buy grass-fed beef online, shipped overnight to your door, at Grassfed Organics.


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Signs of Fatty Acid Imbalance (from the book "Smart Fats")

Dry skin Alligator skin "Chicken skin" on back of arms
Dandruff Lowered immunity Dry eyes
Frequent urination Fatigue Poor wound healing
Irritability Dry, unmanageable hair Frequent infections
Attention deficit Hyperactivity Learning problems
Soft nails Brittle, easily frayed nails Patches of pale skin on cheeks
Allergies Excessive thirst Cracked skin on heels or fingertips

Imagine your brain conducting some routine maintenance on your dopamine and serotonin receptors (implicated in both ADD and mood disorders). These receptors are composed of an Omega-3 fatty acid called DHA.

If you don't have much DHA in your blood, man-made trans-fat molecules may be used as a construction material instead. But trans-fats (hydrogenated oils) are shaped differently than DHA: they are straight while DHA is curved.

The dopamine receptor becomes deformed and doesn't work very well. Repeat this scenario day after day, year after year, and you could wind up with problems like depression and problems concentrating. This problem is most severe for a child whose brain is still developing.

A lack of highly unsaturated fats is particularly noticeable in connection with brain and nerve functioning. An adjustment in diet to one with oil and protein contents high in unsaturated fats brings the best results in children.

Now imagine a child in school learning math. The act of learning requires the brain to form new neural pathways. DHA is needed, especially for the delicate neural synapses which are composed entirely of DHA. This child, like the vast majority of U.S. children, eats almost no Omega-3 fatty acids. What does the brain do?

Again, it struggles and finally uses other types of fats, which are the wrong shape. The neural network develops slowly and is defective. The child has learning and memory problems as well as behavior problems.

In a study of learning ability, rats were raised on either a diet that was deficient in Omega-3 fatty acids or one that was nutritionally complete. Initially, both groups of rats had similar numbers of synaptic vesicles.

After a month-long learning program, however, the Omega-3 enriched rats had considerably more vesicles in their nerve endings and also performed markedly better on the tests. This study suggests there may be a direct connection between the amount Omega-3 fatty acids in your diet, the number of synaptic vesicles in your neurons, and your ability to learn."

Within the next 5 or 10 years the population at large will become familiar with the issue of fatty acid deficiency and the harm causes by transfats, and there will be significant changes in the way food is formulated and marketed.

In response to growing public pressure and the rising number of studies implicating transfats, the FDA has announced a new rule that will require the transfat content of foods, but it won't become effective for a few years.

Companies are beginning to market omega-3 foods, like tuna and eggs from chickens fed with high-omega 3 foods.

Babyfood companies like Gerber are talking about adding DHA to foods (meanwhile the same food still contains transfats). In Japan parents have been giving their kids DHA supplements for years to improve their grades.

Research has shown that the diets of hunter/gatherers were rich in Omega-3's. They ate a mix of meat, fruits and vegetables, with little or no grains. Green leafy vegetables, certain seeds and nuts, and wild game are rich in Omega-3's.

It turns out that cows, chickens and other animals have much higher levels of Omega-3s when they are fed by "free-range" methods because they eat lots of green leafy vegetables. On the other hand, if they are fed grain, their Omega-3 levels crash. Wild game is much healthier to eat and it is much leaner than farm-raised animals.

Curr Atheroscler Rep. 2001 Mar;3(2):174-9


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Dr. Mercola's Comment:

Most every physician and medical journal is now on board with the need for people to increase their intake of omega 3 & E, but long before it went mainstream I was touting the need for you to seriously consider supplementing your diet with a high-quality source. "High-quality" is the key word, as you must be very careful with what source and even brand you choose. Over the years, I have extensively reviewed the sources of omega-3 and have found the best sources of omega-3 for you.

I urge you to read Omega-3: How to Properly Increase Your Intake now for the most highly recommended sources of omega-3.
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Old 10-25-2005, 08:21 PM   #6
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Re: Omega info...All in one Thread.

Dr. Weil at www.drweil.com recommends to take flax seeds if one cannot tolerate fish oil because it is a vegetarian source of omega 3. He advises to purchase the seeds, grind 1-2 tablespoons up with a coffee grinder and eat it. He suggests to grind it fresh every day. Sprinkle them on cereal or salads.
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Old 10-25-2005, 09:18 PM   #7
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Re: Omega info...All in one Thread.

Flaxseed is actually a source of ALA alpha-linolenic acid and the body has to convert it to the DHA and EPA that is needed for brain health. The problem is (from what I've read) a great many individuals have trouble making this conversion.

So I sometimes supplement with flaxseed, but I don't want to assume it's doing the job on it's own. Therefore I still opt to take the Fish Oil and use flaxseed as an addition.

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Old 01-04-2006, 04:18 PM   #8
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Re: Omega info...All in one Thread.

Interesting link. Lists diseases and the benefits for each derived from Omega's.

http://www.fatsforhealth.com/library...s/Fish_Oil.php
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Old 01-04-2006, 08:37 PM   #9
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Re: Omega info...All in one Thread.

An excellent link Darlene. Thanks!!
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Old 01-09-2006, 10:05 AM   #10
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Re: Omega info...All in one Thread.

I don't want to confuse anyone here. Any filtered Fish Oil IS beneficial!!

I asked my naturopathic doc why she recommended me to take Cod Liver Oil (fish oil) instead of the regular Fish Oil.

She basically told me that Cod Liver Oil contains Vitamin A and that particular vitamin is beneficial for the liver if one has been or is on pharmaceutical drugs. She also told me that it is NOT a detoxifying agent. Due to time contraints I couldn't go deeper into this.
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Old 01-09-2006, 11:24 AM   #11
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Re: Omega info...All in one Thread.

And it goes without saying that The Cod Liver is also a great source of Vitamin D. Since Vitamin D has an influence on so many things. Helps with depression, bone health, cancer etc. And since we get so little sun (the main source of vitamin D) getting it from Cod Liver Oil during the winter months is very beneficial in my opinion.

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Old 01-27-2006, 07:44 PM   #12
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Re: Omega info...All in one Thread.

Is Omega 3 completely safe to take with Paxil? I saw some things on the net about how Omega 3's increase dopamine and serotonin and could possibly cause serotonin syndrome when taken with an SSRI. I know I can't believe everything on the net, so I wanted to ask to see if anyone here would know. Thanks!
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Old 02-20-2006, 12:59 PM   #13
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Re: Omega info...All in one Thread.

Fatal Flaws in New Review of Omega-3 / Cancer Prevention Link


The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) recently released a "meta-analysis" of several dozen studies on omega-3 fatty acid intake. The authors came to the conclusion that dietary omega-3 fatty acids are unlikely to prevent cancer.

However, many experts on the subject of omega-3's and cancer, including Dr. William Lands and Dr. W. Elaine Hardman, agreed that the data from the studies was inadequate and unsuitable for the kind of analysis it was subjected to.

These problems, they argue, make it impossible to come to any meaningful conclusions from the data.

Problems in the studies included:

They failed to determine or consider two key factors: omega-6 intake and overall dietary patterns over time

They did not distinguish between intake of plant omega-3's versus marine omega-3's, or between lean and fatty fish, whose omega-3 content can vary by factors of 10 to 20.

Participants' diets were relatively low in fish (e.g., one-half serving per week), and therefore also low in marine omega-3's, in many of the studies that showed no cancer-preventive benefit

Cancers take years or decades to develop, but most of the population studies took only brief snapshots of participants' dietary habits


Vital Choices January 30, 2006



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dr. Mercola's Comment:


Don't you just hate it when the media gives you mixed messages? One day fish is healthy the next day it isn't. Who are you going to believe?

Well that is one of the primary purposes of this newsletter, to give you my additional insights on breaking health news to help you sort through all the material. This way you can make an intelligent decision about what is true for you.

This JAMA report on omega-3 fats could have dire health consequences for you if you decide to follow its conclusions.

Unfortunately, due to the sensationalist nature of these "findings," it has picked up some steam in the mass media and is being presented there as truth when in fact it is anything but the truth.

Extensive and strong evidence has shown that omega-3 fats from fish can indeed help prevent cancer. Furthermore, other studies have demonstrated these fats can be very highly effective at helping to:

Fight depression
Fight inflammatory diseases
Allergy prevention
Fight many other diseases as well
In my two-decades-plus of clinical experience as a physician, I have witnessed this same strong correlation between fish oil and improved health. Regularly consuming fish oil and clean, healthy fish is one of the strongest recommendations I can advise, as most reading this newsletter are dangerously deficient in omega-3s from marine life.

However, be warned that fish would be one of the planet's healthiest foods except for one very dangerous and sad issue -- nearly ALL fish from ALL sources (ocean, lakes, rivers, & farm-raised) is now highly contaminated by mercury and other toxins.

I strongly urge you NOT to eat any fish unless you are absolutely certain it has been proven free of dangerous levels of mercury, PCBs, etc.

One fish I DO highly and confidently recommend (the ONLY one I personally trust and consume) is the Vital Choice line of fresh and canned wild red salmon. Their salmon comes from pristine Alaskan waters, tastes delicious, and I have personally had their salmon laboratory-tested.

I encourage you to check out and try the Vital Choice line of wild red salmon now, including the filets, smoked salmon, kosher lox and more!

For most people, though, fish oil supplementation is a far more cost-effective solution.

When using fish oil it is important to obtain a high-quality reputable brand. In my research -- and in my clinical experience with my patients -- I have found that:

The liquid form is superior to capsules
Certain brands definitely seem inferior to others
The Carlson's brand of fish oil/cod liver oil is of an exceptional quality and purity
It is likely not the only brand in the world of such high quality, but up to this point it is the only one of such quality that I can recommend, so I now offer the Carlson's fish oil and cod liver oil on Mercola.com; you can also check your local health food store to see if they carry it.

http://www.mercola.com/2006/feb/18/f...ntion_link.htm

Darlene
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Old 04-13-2006, 07:36 AM   #14
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Re: Omega info...All in one Thread.

Omega-3 moves into medical mainstream.

Newsday (Melville, NY); 4/11/2006


Byline: Jamie Talan

Apr. 11--In the days following the Jan. 2 Sago Mine explosion disaster, the only survivor, Randal McCloy Jr., was experiencing multiple organ failure and severe brain damage.

Dr. Julian Bailes, McCloy's neurosurgeon at the West Virginia University School of Medicine and head of the trauma center, was up to speed on the latest benefits of the "miracle molecule" omega-3 fatty acids when he phoned Barry Sears of Zone Diet fame to ask about a recommended dose for the very ill miner.

"I've read everything Sears has written," Bailes said. "And he convinced me that DHA could play a role in Mr. McCloy's recovery. He sent me his product, which was the main source in his [McCloy's] treatments."

Omega-3 is an essential amino acid that is in short supply in American diets, and its use has catapulted up the charts of popular nutrient supplements. And seemingly for good reason. It has so many jobs in the human body that cardiologists, neurologists, psychiatrists and now trauma surgeons are using these naturally safe amino acids to prevent and treat a wide variety of medical problems.

Sears, who has studied omega-3 fatty acids and now manufacturers his own pharmaceutical-grade product, suggested that Bailes administer a total of 18 grams of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the two most important omega-3 fatty acids, via feeding tube. McCloy remained on the supplement via feeding tube until his return home March 30.

High dose for brain repair

This was an extraordinarily high dose, Sears explained, but staff monitored McCloy's blood levels to assure it remained within a certain therapeutic range. The EPA reduced the inflammation caused by the lack of oxygen within the brain, and the DHA was required to repair the damage, Sears said. "I certainly think it played a big role," in his recovery, Bailes said. "How can he rebuild his brain if he doesn't have the substrate to do it?"

After being in a coma for weeks and in rehab for months, the grateful miner is stiff and thin but walking on his own and exercising his weak right arm.

Besides helping heal the brain, omega-3, which is probably one of the most studied natural supplements, has passed muster in helping heal the heart, pancreas, immune system and joints. Potent anti-inflammatories, omega-3 fish oil supplements contain the same fatty acids - DHA and EPA - found in fish. Scientists say the American diet is so depleted of these fatty acids that supplements are not just useful, but necessary.

A recent analysis of several large studies published in the British Medical Journal said the amino acids didn't possess the benefits touted in the medical literature. But many experts say that analysis failed to cover the wide range of scientific findings. Dr. Walter Willett, chairman of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health, said that one large British study with a "sub-optimal design wiped out the benefits from all the other studies." He said many studies have confirmed omega-3 supplements reduce the risk for sudden cardiac death and protect against cardiovascular diseases.

"This has more evidence-based science than any other supplement," said Dr. Steven Lamm, an internist at New York University School of Medicine. "It can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease by lowering triglycerides, and shift the balance between good and bad forms of cholesterol." Its powerful anti-inflammatory qualities also make it a natural for arthritis and other inflammatory diseases.

"Here is one example where more is better," Lamm said.

But just how much? Dr. Joseph Hibbeln of the National Institutes of Health has studied the role of omega-3 fatty acids in depression and seen that 9 grams a day of omega-3 fatty acids are as potent as a prescription antidepressant for some patients. Others say the body needs a minimum of 4 grams a day.

The brain is 60 percent fat, and fatty acids are key to brain health. Hibbeln's work has linked diets rich in omega-3 fish oil to a lower incidence of depression and bipolar illness, and has led to tests of its effects as treatment for these conditions. The results are very impressive, experts say.

Help for bipolar patients

Dr. Andrew Stoll of Harvard Medical School's psychiatry department gave 30 people with bipolar illness (manic-depression) 9.6 grams daily of omega-3 supplements or a placebo pill and followed them for several months. He found significant improvement in the groups taking omega-3. Scientists say that it works because the physical component of the brain's membrane system is made up of DHA.

Many other groups have found similar benefits.

Omega-3 supplements are also being used to prevent or treat heart disease, arthritis and other psychiatric illnesses, he said.

Omega-3 fatty acids are found in algae. Fish live on algae, which is how humans consume these key fatty acids.

The benefits on heart health led the American Heart Association to recommend a diet rich in fish oil. In a nurses study at Harvard Public School of Health, 84,688 women were followed from 1980 to 1994, and researchers documented the foods they ate, finding that women who ate fish once a week had a 34 percent lower incidence of death from heart disease and a 25 percent lower incidence of non-fatal heart attacks. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association identified the omega-3 fish oil as the reason.

Dr. David Perlmutter of Naples, Fla., an author of the "Better Brain Book," said that DHA enhances a brain-derived growth factor and could explain why expectant mothers who take omega-3 supplements have children who score higher on intelligence tests. He cited another study that found the amino acid supplementation reduced the risk of Alzheimer's disease. "We've got to build the brain out of the right stuff," he said.

Even good for babies

From heart disease to prostate cancer, scientists have been testing the power of these supplements with great success. Perlmutter puts newborns on the supplements, as well as 90-year-olds. "Our bodies will produce some DHA, but it's low even on a good day."

People who want to get natural sources of omega-3 fatty acids will do best by eating three fish portions a week. Companies like Burnbrae Farms are now making omega-3-enriched eggs.

The first recorded use of fish oils dates back 200 years, when cod liver oil was used for arthritis. "If there is one thing you can do to help your body," Sears added, "take your fish oil."

Fatty fish facts

Fish are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, and experts say you may get enough of the amino acids DHA and EPA by consuming oily fish three times a week. Here are some fish foods high in these nutrients (4-ounces cooked, 5 ounces raw). Nutritionists recommended consuming 1 to 3 grams of omega-3 fatty acids per day.

Flounder and sole: 0.4 grams

Salmon

Atlantic, farmed: 1.8 grams

Atlantic, wild: 1.6 grams

Coho: farmed: 1.1 grams

Coho, wild: 0.9 grams

Shrimp: 0.3 grams

Swordfish: 0.1 grams

Trout: 1.0 grams

Tuna: 0.1 to 1.3 grams

SOURCE: "KRAUSE'S FOOD, NUTRITION, & DIET THERAPY"
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Old 04-13-2006, 11:11 PM   #15
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Re: Omega info...All in one Thread.

This is so interesting DeLynn. I love fish and eat it at least three times a week. Thanks for posting.
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Old 11-09-2006, 08:47 PM   #16
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Re: Omega info...All in one Thread.

Feature articles on omega-3:
http://www.newstarget.com/omega-3.html
It's got many articles on the benefit of Omega 3.
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Old 11-14-2006, 05:21 PM   #17
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Re: Omega info...All in one Thread.

http://www.thewest.com.au/default.as...ontentID=13147
Fish oil best bet in depression fight
15th November 2006, 6:15 WST

Omega-3 rich fish oil has come up trumps as a natural way to beat depression, showing more promise than other remedies such as St John’s wort and B vitamins.

Researchers from Sydney University’s department of psychology have found that popping fish oil supplements or having three serves a week of oily-type fish such as salmon, sardines or tuna can ease the symptoms of depression.

Writing in the Dietitians Association of Australia’s journal Nutrition and Dietetics, they argued that omega-3s could have a role alongside antidepressants in helping some of the estimated one million Australians who have depression.

Fish oil is already seen as something of a wonder potion to reduce the risk of heart disease by making blood less likely to clot and protecting against irregular heartbeats which can cause sudden death.

Lead author and dietitian Dianne Volker said a review of all existing literature on the subject had concluded that good nutrition played a key role in managing depression.

“We have found evidence of the potential therapeutic benefits of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the diet which may contribute to an eventual recovery in the long term,” she said.

“This is definitely a valuable add-on to the psychosocial and pharmacological treatment therapy that depression sufferers undergo.”

The study also found that vitamins B6 and B12, folate, the chemical S-Adenosyl-Methionine (SAMe), the amino acid tryptophan and the herbal remedy St John’s wort showed promise in relieving depressive symptoms.

But the researchers said it was too early to say how much of each compound or vitamin was needed to have a noticeable effect on depression.

They said the safest and most sensible approach to take when considering omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation was to follow the recommendations for reducing the risk of heart disease.


CATHY O’LEARY
MEDICAL EDITOR
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Old 06-12-2007, 07:32 PM   #24
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Re: Omega info...All in one Thread.

is anyone taking liquid fish oil?

I seem to get indigestion and fish burps. I tried enteric coated as well and no better results.

I found this NOW brand fish oil today. You take 1 and a half teaspoons and get 1000mg epa. Thats better than what I have now. I need 5 capsules of what I have no to equal 1000mg epa. This stuff is lemon flavored and supposedly is easier to take and no fish burps. I was told by the guy at the store that the gel caps might be what causes the indigestion.

Anyway, before I plop down $20. Anyway try something like this? $20 is enough for nearly 3 months so its not that bad pricewise.
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Old 06-24-2007, 01:33 PM   #25
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Re: Omega info...All in one Thread.

There is some very useful information here.....hopefully omega 3 will be added to more foods (i use the eggs enriched with it). Its a lot of reading though and I was just wondering, what dose of omega 3 supplement is most effective? Aplologies if this question has been asked and answered many times before, my mind isnt up to fact finding at the moment.
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